<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META name=GENERATOR content="MSHTML 9.00.8112.16443">
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY dir=ltr bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV dir=ltr>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">
<DIV>Hello,</DIV>
<DIV>VI users kind of feel a little superior to sighted people when it comes to 
reading entry level books because they don’t have to memorize all the clefs, so 
when their mates are struggling with note identification the blind person is 
already doing sight singing.</DIV>
<DIV>So what ever you do I would keep that in mind. In an introduction to music 
for the blind student, the student is asked to make a cheetsheet so they are 
able to read off that sheet each time they encounter the dynamic mark. Because 
students are able to keep their place with one hand and read the cheetsheet with 
another, this is ideal. </DIV>
<DIV>I have no idea what the “Flying blind” exercises. But I would say somewhere 
that you are adapting this book for blind users. Also wouldn’t it be more 
prudent to ask the student to rewrite the examples rather than telling their 
teacher? Because aren’t the books meant for students to read on their own?</DIV>
<DIV>Thanks,</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV style="FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: 12pt">Brandon 
Keith Biggs<BR></DIV>
<DIV 
style="FONT-STYLE: normal; DISPLAY: inline; FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: small; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: none">
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt tahoma">
<DIV><FONT size=3 face=Calibri></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV style="BACKGROUND: #f5f5f5">
<DIV style="font-color: black"><B>From:</B> <A 
title=lydia.machell@primavistamusic.com 
href="mailto:lydia.machell@primavistamusic.com">Lydia Machell</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Sent:</B> Tuesday, April 17, 2012 12:02 AM</DIV>
<DIV><B>To:</B> <A title=menvi-discuss@menvi.org 
href="mailto:menvi-discuss@menvi.org">menvi-discuss@menvi.org</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Subject:</B> [Menvi-discuss] Color references and other sight-related 
material</DIV></DIV></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV></DIV>
<DIV 
style="FONT-STYLE: normal; DISPLAY: inline; FONT-FAMILY: 'Calibri'; COLOR: #000000; FONT-SIZE: small; FONT-WEIGHT: normal; TEXT-DECORATION: none">
<DIV><FONT face=Arial>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial>I'm producing braille editions of the Piano Adventures 
teaching series and there are instances where the text needs to be adapted for 
VI users. For instance, where the student is asked to circle items in a piece, 
or fill in blanks on the page, we have replaced the instruction with "show your 
teacher...". These are just practical considerations. But what about a piece 
that asks the student to "choose a color for each dynamic mark"? Or memory 
exercises referred to as "Blind Flying"?  As a publisher, should our 
principle be to show braille users exactly what's in the print, or should we 
adapt the contents for our market?  The first approach may make us seem 
insensitive, while the latter could seem patronising. We just want to get these 
excellent resources out there in the most user-friendly form.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Calibri></FONT> </DIV></FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial>Lydia Machell (</FONT><FONT face=Arial>Prima Vista Braille 
Music Services)<BR></FONT></DIV>
<P>
<HR>
Thank you for subscribing to MENVI.  Should you wish to unsubscribe, change 
your delivery, or set any other options available to you, please view the list 
information page below.  Should you have any questions, please contact the 
owner of the 
list.<BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Menvi-discuss 
mailing 
list<BR>Menvi-discuss@menvi.org<BR>http://menvi.org/mailman/listinfo/menvi-discuss_menvi.org<BR></DIV></DIV></DIV></BODY></HTML>